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Who is the Greatest Japanese Woman, Ever?

Started by upamfva, 2022/10/12 11:20PM
Latest post: 2022/10/12 11:20PM, Views: 115, Posts: 1
Who is the Greatest Japanese Woman, Ever?
#1   2022/10/12 11:20PM
upamfva
Who is the Greatest Japanese Woman, Ever?



Two years ago, TW conducted a survey asking 500 Tokyo residents who they would vote for as Japan’s greatest-ever person. As the top 25 were dominated by men, we decided to ask the same number of people about the country’s greatest-ever women. Here’s a look at the results.To get more news about 免费国产线观看免费观看, you can visit our official website.

25. EMPRESS MASAKO
Harvard graduate Masako Owada met Naruhito, the then Crown Prince of Japan at a banquet in 1986. Smitten, he pursued her for six years. Not wanting to give up her promising career as a diplomat, Owada twice turned down his marriage proposals before eventually saying yes in 1992. For years she avoided public appearances due to a stress-induced “adjustment disorder.” In May, she became the Empress.

24. RAICHO HIRATSUKA
Political activist Raicho Hiratsuka was one of the founders of Seito (Bluestocking), Japan’s first all-women literary magazine. “In the beginning, woman was the sun,” she wrote. “An authentic person. Now she’s the moon, a wan and sickly moon, dependent on another, reflecting another’s brilliance.” Hiratsuka established the New Women’s Association with Fusae Ichikawa, which led to the repeal of Article 5, a law banning women from participating in politics.
23. SAORI YOSHIDA
“I strongly feel I’ve done everything I could do,” said Saori Yoshida at a press conference this year to announce her retirement from wrestling. Competing in the 53kg and 55kg divisions, she won 13 consecutive world titles, four Asian Games, and three Olympic gold medals. She is Japan’s second most decorated female Olympian behind wrestler Kaori Icho who has four golds.

22. MASAKO HOJO
Wife of Minamoto no Yoritomo, the first shogun of the Kamakura period, Masako Hojo has been described as the “most important woman in Japanese military history.” She rode alongside her husband on most of his campaigns and was only absent when giving birth to their children. Following his death, she shaved her head and became a Buddhist nun, though still continued her career as a politician.

21. SAYURI YOSHINAGA
Winner of a record four Japan Academy Best Actress awards, Sayuri Yoshinaga’s breakthrough role was in Kirio Urayama’s 1962 film, Foundry Town, which was nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. Since playing the title character in Yumechiyo’s Diary, a 1984 TV drama (and later movie) about a geisha exposed to atomic radiation while in her mother’s womb, Yoshinaga has worked for the anti-nuclear movement.

20. TSUDA UMEKO
In 1871, six-year-old Tsuda Umeko was the youngest of five women selected for the Iwakura Mission, a diplomatic voyage with the aim of surveying Western civilization. In 1900 she founded Joshi Eigaku Juku (now Tsuda University), one of the oldest and most prestigious higher educational institutions for women in Japan. From 2024, she will be the face of the ¥5,000 bill.

19. FUSAE ICHIKAWA
A central figure in the struggle for women’s rights in Japan, Fusae Ichikawa co-founded the New Women’s Association with Raicho Hiratsuka and established Japan’s first women’s suffrage movement alongside Shigeri Yamataka. They lobbied for the inclusion of females in the 1925 General Election Law and as a result women got the vote at the end of WWII.

18. LADY KASUGA
Hailing from a prominent samurai family of the Azuchi-Momoyama and Edo periods, Lady Kasuga (Kasuga no Tsubone) was the wet nurse of the third Tokugawa shogun Iemitsu and exerted great influence within his court. When the Ooku (women’s quarter of the castle) was established in 1607 she achieved the rank of otoshiyori (senior ladyship). The Kasuga neighborhood of Bunkyo in Tokyo was named in her honor.


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